The Habit of Encouraging Others

J.R. Miller


"For you know that we dealt with each of you as a father deals with his own children, encouraging, comforting and urging you to live lives worthy of God, who calls you into his kingdom and glory!" 1 Thessalonians 2:11-12

In one of her books Miss Mulock tells of a gentleman and a lady walking one day in a lumber-yard beside a dirty, foul-smelling river. The lady said, "How good these pine boards smell!" "Pine boards!" sniffed her companion. "Just smell this foul river!" "No, thank you," the lady replied, "I prefer to smell the pine boards." She was wiser than he.

It is far better for us to find the sweetness that is in the air, than the foulness. It is far better to talk to others of the smell of pine boards, than of the heavy odors of stagnant rivers.

Yet too many people seem ever to have an instinct for the unpleasant things. They never see the beauty but they always find the disagreeable. They have no eye for the roses but they are sure to find even the smallest thorn. They never discuss the good qualities in those about them but they instantly detect the faults.

It is a far nobler thing when one has learned to find the things that are lovely and good and true in those about one and to be blind to the blemishes and defects. It is a pitiful waste of time and strength for one engaged in Christian work, for example, to do nothing but look for mistakes or imperfections in that which others are doing. It is far wiser to devote one's life and energy to doing good in a positive way.

We do not have to answer for other people's mistakes. We are not set to be judges of other people's motives. The only true Christian course is to do our own part as well as we possibly can, having charity meanwhile for all about us who are engaged in the work of our common Master.

It shows a very narrow spirit to have nothing but evil to say of those who are working alongside of us in the same vineyard. Very likely they are quite as holy as we are, and are doing their work quite as well as we are doing ours. But if they are not, our sin in watching them with unkindly eye is worse than any ordinary mistake in their service could be.

We are told that once the disciples criticized very sharply another friend of their Master's, calling her way of working a wasteful way. But we should not forget that it was Judas who led in this criticism and faultfinding, and that Jesus severely rebuked the censorious spirit in his disciples and spoke in warmest defense of the gentle woman who had done what she could.

We should train ourselves, therefore, to the utmost patience with those who work beside us in the service of the same Master. We should seek to encourage them in every possible way. There may be faults in their method but, if so, the Master will look after these, and certainly it is no part of our duty to judge, to find fault, to condemn.

We are likely to overlook the unlovingness of this spirit of criticism and fault-finding. "By this shall all men know that you are my disciples, if you have love one to another," said the Master himself. Love implies not only patience with the infirmities of others but also readiness to help them and to work with them in all kindly, sympathetic ways. Love sends us forth to be helpers of each other not hinderers; encouragers not discouragers.

It is very easy for us to go forth any day and make life harder for every person we meet. We do this when we assume a superior air, when we relate ourselves to others only as a critic, a fault-finder.

The worst of all heresies is the heresy of unlovingness. We understand the spirit of the gospel of Christ only when we get its thoughtfulness, forbearance, gentleness, into our life. We begin to be like Christ, only when in us is born the desire to be of use to everyone we meet. Many people go among others, however, bearing the name of Christ yet lacking the spirit of Christ. Instead of making life easier for those among whom they mingle they make it harder! They say discouraging things. Even when they imagine they are giving comfort they are only adding to the burden of sorrow.

Some good people go into sick rooms, with true sympathy in their heart and desire to do good but only add to the pain of those they would help.

Job's three friends, the suffering and bereft man found to be "miserable comforters." Scarcely any better comforters are many of those who come to people in these days as messengers of consolation. They go over all the sorrow, opening the wounds afresh instead of saying cheerful, uplifting, inspiring things which would have made the sad hearts braver and stronger.

Shall we not train ourselves to speak only kindly words, to say only encouraging things, to give only cheer? It is a great thing to live so that everyone who meets us shall be a little happier, with a little more courage for life's struggles, and with new hope in the heart. Words of encouragement and good cheer are better than angels' visits to those to whom they are spoken.

Thackeray tells of an English nobleman who always carried his pocket full of acorns as he walked over his estate, and whenever he found a bare spot he would plant one of these. So should we carry with us ever a heart full of loving thoughts and impulses, and whenever we find a life that is sad, discouraged, or defeated we should drop a seed of kindness which by and by will grow into something beautiful.

"Therefore encourage one another and build each other up, just as in fact you are doing." 1 Thessalonians 5:11