A worm, a gnat, a fly, a hair, a seed of a raison, a skin of a grape Re: A Cabinet of Jewels, Chapters one and two
Glued to their lusts

(Thomas Brooks, "A Cabinet of Choice Jewels" 1669)

Sinners' hearts are so glued to their lusts, that they
will rather part with their nearest, dearest, and choicest
enjoyments—than part with their sins! Yes, they will rather
part with God, Christ, and all the glory of heaven—than
they will part with some darling lust.

"When He comes, He will convict the world about sin."
    John 16:8

The first work of the Spirit upon the soul,
is to make a man . . .
  look upon sin as an enemy,
  to deal with sin as an enemy,
  to hate sin as an enemy,
  to loathe sin as an enemy,
  to fear sin as an enemy, and
  to arm against sin as an enemy.

Of all the vile things in the world, sin is the
most defiling thing; it makes us red with
guilt and black with filth.

Inward corruptions grieve the gracious soul.

"Oh," says the gracious soul,
"that I were but rid of . . .
  this proud heart,
  this hard heart,
  this unbelieving heart,
  this unclean heart,
  this froward heart,
  this earthly heart of mine!"

The Christian has a universal willingness
to be rid of all sin. The enmity which grace
works in the heart, is against all sin:
  profitable sins,
  pleasurable sins,
  disparaging sins,
  disgracing sins,
  small sins,
  great sins.

A gracious heart had much rather, if it were put to his
choice, live without all sin—than to have allowance to
wallow in any sin. He had rather live without the least
sin—than to have liberty to live in the most flesh-pleasing
sin. It is certain that sin is more afflictive to a gracious
soul, than all the losses, crosses, troubles, and trials
that he meets with in the world.

True grace would not have one Canaanite left
in the holy land; he would have every Egyptian
drowned in the red sea of Christ's blood!

"I hate every false way." Psalm 139:24

Saving grace makes a man as willing to leave his lusts,
  as a slave is willing to leave his chains,
  or a prisoner his dungeon,
  or a beggar his rags.

A sincere heart had much rather be rid of his sins
than of his sufferings; yes, of the least sins than
of the greatest sufferings.